100 Deadliest Days for Teen Drivers

June 19, 2017

Cherry Hill Car Accident Lawyers discuss 100 Deadliest Days for Teen DriversWhen school lets out for the summer, teenage drivers can be found on the road at all hours, driving to friends’ homes, summer jobs, and fun adventures like days at the beach or the amusement park. More teen drivers means more inexperienced drivers on the road, which is correlated with an increase in car accidents involving drivers aged 16 to 19. AAA has dubbed the approximate three months that follow Memorial Day “the 100 deadliest days” of the year for teen drivers.

Teens Drive More During the Summer Months

According to AAA, the average number of crashes involving drivers aged 16 to 19 during the summer months is 16 percent higher per day when compared with other times of year. From 2010 to 2014, more than 5,000 people died in car accidents involving teen drivers.

This is attributed to a few factors. In addition to there being more inexperienced drivers on the road during the summer, these drivers are often on unfamiliar roads, potentially facing unfamiliar traffic patterns such as driving on divided highways and navigating traffic circles. Teenage drivers are also more likely to be driving with friends during the summer, increasing their risk of distractions.

Distracted Driving Can Injure and Kill Teenage Drivers

According to a study published by AAA’s Association for Traffic Safety, 60 percent of crashes involving teenage drivers were partially or entirely due to driver distraction. According to the National Safety Council, having friends in the car increases a teen driver’s likelihood of being involved in a fatal crash by 44 percent.

Communication About Safe Driving and Driving Laws Can Keep Teens Safe

The best way for parents of teenage drivers to reduce their children’s chances of being involved in a fatal crash this summer is to make safe driving a frequent topic of discussion. Parents should stress the importance of focusing solely on the road and any potential hazards, not one’s phone or friends, while driving. Parents should also model safe driving behaviors while driving with their children, rather than contradicting their own advice.

When an adolescent receives their provisional driver’s license, parents should also discuss New Jersey’s laws for provisional drivers with them. These include:

  • Displaying a reflective red tag on both license plates
  • Only driving between the hours of 5:00 a.m. and 11:01 p.m.
  • Wearing a seatbelt at all times
  • Only driving with one non-related passenger unless the driver’s parent or guardian is also in the car
  • Refraining from using a cell phone completely, even with a hands-free headset or integration software with the vehicle

Young drivers must follow these rules for at least one year before they can upgrade to a basic New Jersey driver’s license. To receive a basic driver’s license, the driver must also be at least 18 years old.

Cherry Hill Car Accident Lawyers at DiTomaso Law Represent Victims Injured in Car Accidents Involving Teen Drivers

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured in a car accident, we can help you recover compensation needed to cover medical bills, lost wages, and other financial losses. Complete our online contact form or call 856-414-0010 to arrange a free consultation with our dedicated team of Cherry Hill car accident lawyers at DiTomaso Law. We are located in Cherry Hill, New Jersey and serve clients from the Philadelphia area and South Jersey.