Philadelphia Construction Accident Lawyers: Danger at Smaller Construction Sites

May 18, 2016

Smaller construction sites are far more dangerous than larger construction sites, according to a recent study. The study analyzed about 1,000 construction accidents and fatalities that occurred over five years. According to the data, 80 percent of all construction accident fatalities occurred on smaller sites. Buildings under 10 stories were defined by the study as small sites. On the smallest of sites – buildings five stories tall or under – 60 percent of construction accident fatalities occurred. The Department of Buildings are 43 percent more likely to issue safety violations to small construction sites in comparison to construction sites that are 10 stories tall or more.

The reasoning for why smaller construction sites are more prone to construction accidents was not analyzed as a part of the study. However, the study did speak as to why smaller construction sites may be more prone to accidents and how smaller sites could reduce the likelihood of injuries and death. The authors accredited the upsurge of accidents at smaller construction zones to:

  • The lack of dedicated safety personnel.
  • Looser safety protocols.
  • The probability that the construction company working on the smaller site has less experience than those normally working on larger sites.

The results of the study are shocking to the conscience, especially if you or a loved one regularly works at a smaller construction site. Luckily, the authors of the study present several recommendations on how to stay safe at construction sites smaller than 10 stories. The study proposes that investigations be made into how smaller sites are treating their workers and the public since a large majority of construction sites in Pennsylvania are smaller sites. The Department of Buildings has to be fully staffed and their employees fully trained in order for the smaller sites to be inspected.

The best practices that companies in the construction industry use on larger, safer construction sites should also be implemented into smaller sites. Some of the most helpful and safe practices that have been shown to work on larger construction sites include:

  • Requiring trained and alert safety personnel on-site to ensure that everyone is safe and that no risks are being taken;
  • Having all workers undergo training for supported scaffold and fall protection;
  • Creating plans for high winds, which better protects workers from falling material. Falling material hitting and injuring a person accounts for almost a third of all construction accidents on small sites.

Philadelphia Construction Accident Lawyers at DiTomaso Law Represent Individuals Injured or Killed in Construction Accidents

If you, a loved one or someone you know has been injured or killed in a construction accident, contact DiTomaso Law to speak to one of our Philadelphia construction accident lawyers. Call us today at 215-426-4493 or fill out our online contact form to schedule a consultation.

Our offices are located conveniently in Cherry Hill, New Jersey and Philadelphia so we can serve clients throughout South Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania.